I think these questions are important to ask today," Verhoeven says. "The irony of course is that the purpose of the technology is to allow you to be located," Nyong'o notes.He also wanted to question the privacy relationship between the user of such apps and the companies that own them - and often, their users' data. "But it's a delicate balance between when you choose to send out your location and when someone can just find it." It's often said that young Germans have never been so conformist.

" But Tavia Nyong'o, a professor of performance studies at New York University, says the project raises a lot of red flags, in particular about privacy.

"That would seem to be what drove people's outrage," Nyong'o says.

The artist maintains the project stoked a necessary debate on privacy and identity online.

GEO-dating apps still appealing Grindr has become one of the best-known sex navigation apps.

Facebook is testing a new function across six countries.

With this, media outlets' and other companies' products will be less prominently placed on its page. Energy production and use account for about two-thirds of all greenhouse gas emissions worldwide.

And Verhoeven says few have taken the time to examine the effect the app may be having on their ability to connect with other people in public spaces.

"The feeling we have on the Internet is that we are safe there, that no body is looking at us," Verhoeven says.

() Today, half the world's electric cars are on Chinese roads: the country is set on becoming the world's technology and market leader.