If you share friends or likes on Facebook, you see that, too.(This is a good time to recommend that you like Vox on Facebook, thus enabling you to match other Vox fans on Tinder and keep the lineage of Vox fandom running for many generations.) But overall, you get a lot less information than on Hinge. Part of what's made Tinder successful is that it greatly reduces the amount of effort that goes into setting up an online profile; while sites like OKCupid require you to answer huge batteries of personal questions ("Do you own any dice with more than six sides?

If nobody is friends with your friends — or if you've already made your way through all those potential matches — the app starts recommending more tangential connections, like people whose Facebook friends share Facebook friends with you.

But the focus is on finding people who are somewhere in your social network.

Previous iterations of the app gave users new potential matches once a day, but now matches come in a regular trickle, like Tinder but with lower volume.

The main difference, though, is that Hinge focuses on matching you with people you share Facebook friends with, if you have a Facebook account.

The gender ratio is 50-50, according to Mc Grath, and 90 percent of users are between 23 and 36, making the Hinge user base noticeably older than Tinder's.

(An exact comparison isn't available, but 52 percent of Tinder users are between 18 and 24.) As of March 2014, the app had made 1 million matches; by August it was up to 3 million, and over 8 million by late October.

Tinder will tell you if a user happens to have mutual friends with you, but you can't screen to see those users first.

Here's a typical screen a Hinge user will see upon opening the app: (Courtesy of Hinge) See the little dots to the left?

There are a lot of horrible people in the world, and OKCupid and can't do all that much to keep you from going to dinner with them.

Moreover, dating sites aimed at heterosexuals tend to feature a lot of male harassment of female users, sometimes to the point that women's inboxes become sufficiently clogged to render the service unusable.

That's a pretty rosy assessment, but the analogy is not all wrong.